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 Roxas of Yolanda

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PostSubject: Informal supply chains help feed typhoon survivors   November 25th 2013, 5:55 pm

Supplementing the quickening relief effort trying to help survivors of the Philippines typhoon is an informal -- and sometimes underground -- supply chain that is helping some people put food on the table.
Families from as far away as Manila and the southern island of Mindanao endure long journeys by air, sea and land to bring food packs, tents, medicines and other materials to affected relatives.
Friends stay with friends and communities share whatever they have, especially if a neighbour has babies, children or elderly members.
Marife Sumapig and her family have received only one food pack since Super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms ever to hit land, smashed through the central Philippines on November 8, leaving more than 5,000 dead and millions homeless.
The aid package contained four kilograms (nine pounds) of rice, some cup noodles and two cans of sardines -- barely enough for a few days.
"But despite getting help only once, we have not gotten hungry so far. There seems to be food on the table every day," she told AFP from her damaged house in the city of Tacloban, one of the hardest-hit places.
"Today I ate lunch at my sister's place. Yesterday, my husband bought some vegetables in another town, so we're tiding over."
Sumapig, her husband and their eight-year-old son have taken up an offer from a friend to stay at his house, one of the few private buildings in the city that is still habitable.
Help is coming in from Manila, where their 17-year-old daughter Ameel is studying. "When her classmates learned that she is from Tacloban, they pooled their resources and gave her some money and groceries," Marife Sumapig said.
In the town of Burawin, about 40 kilometres (25 miles) from Tacloban, three men were chewing on dried squid as they supped a gin and cola, courtesy of a relative who had travelled from the city of General Santos on Mindanao to bring the goodies.
30-hour journey to deliver food
"It took me about 30 hours' travelling by ship and bus to come here," said Juanito Nario, 47.
He told AFP he brought the squid, rice, noodles, canned goods, medicine, soap and matches to his sister.
A less talked-about, but no less important side of the food chain in Tacloban and nearby towns, say residents, are items taken from two department stores in the first few days after the typhoon.
At the time there were no police officers on the streets and chaos reigned, resulting in a free-for-all as hungry people helped themselves to groceries and other merchandise.
A Tacloban entrepreneur, who did not want to be named because of the sensitivity of the issue, said his family had been receiving food from scavengers they had sheltered in the storm's immediate aftermath.
He had allowed five families to put up temporary shelters on his wide front yard just after the storm hit, and received the kindness back many times over.
"I was surprised because they would give us branded sausages and hot dogs which I knew came from a certain mall," the businessman said, apparently referring to the Robinsons supermarket chain, which was was raided by mobs for four days before out-of-town police were flown in to impose order.
"We knew they were looted groceries but what can we do? We need food," said the businessman.
"And they were generous enough to share them with us. Some of the stuff we also shared with those in need," he said.
Over the past week, AFP has been offered several items that appeared to have come from shops that have not been open since the storm, including alcohol and fruit.
"I think that by ransacking the supermarket, the residents forgot the trauma they suffered from the typhoon. Even those we knew had relatives who died participated in the looting," the businessman added.
"It seems that the motto was: You're not from Tacloban if you did not get something."

source: http://ph.news.yahoo.com/informal-supply-chains-help-feed-typhoon-survivors-042817907.html
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PostSubject: Roxas of Yolanda   November 25th 2013, 5:49 pm

Two weeks into the Typhoon Yolanda disaster, the ugly head of partisan politics has already surfaced and now threatens domestic-based relief and rehabilitation efforts thus far. News of shenanigans is increasing throughout the disaster areas. These ranged from barangay officials cornering the aid and limiting the latter to those who voted for them during the last barangay elections to the more serious charge of severely limiting aid and taking over oppositionist local government units.

A man walks among debris of a destroyed convention center in Palo, Leyte province, central Philippines, on November …
The charge of partisan politicking has been aired in Tacloban City and Ormoc City, two major population centers in the path of the typhoon. In the former case, Mayor Alfred Romualdez accused Secretary of Interior and Local Government Manuel Roxas II of trying to take over the Tacloban City government as a condition for faster and massive national relief and rehabilitation support. In the latter, 4th District representative Lucy Torres-Gomez decried the over-all scarcity of aid for the 19 towns in western Leyte to which Ormoc City acted as a hub, and the partisan manner of distribution by local officials.
The more serious accusations were raised against Secretary Roxas, who was accused at various times, of interfering in the smooth and efficient flow of relief goods. This was the case during the first days in Tacloban when C130 planes moved more personnel, including media, than goods; the supposed requirement for his personal approval of movement of relief goods, including in Matnog ferry port, to certain areas deemed as opposition, the delay and/or little quantity of relief goods and personnel into opposition areas, and the threat to administratively charge Tacloban Mayor Romualdez for supposed negligence of duty.

What is strange about the relief efforts was the silent and merely supportive role of Secretary of National Defense Voltaire Gazmin, who is the chairman of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC). The public impression is that Secretary Roxas is the one running the show. At least, until after the CNN’s Anderson Cooper noticed the disorganization in Tacloban and started asking “Where is government?” 
Then, stranger still, President Aquino hereafter started taking personal charge of the relief efforts. An organizational chart even added two more names above Secretaries Gazmin and Roxas: Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa, Jr. and Secretary to the Cabinet Jose Rene Almendras, who acted in behalf of the President. 
This change of the guards of confirmed the confused state of disaster management of the Yolanda tragedy. However, beyond it, the events showed the political perils of a tragedy. It can make or unmake political careers. Yolanda is bringing the Roxas 2016 presidential ambition to its knees. It may well sunk even the Aquino presidential legacy along with it.

source:http://ph.news.yahoo.com/blogs/parallaxis/roxas-of-yolanda-054919481.html
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